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History Department

The Miskatonic University History Department contains lecture notes and essays on topics ranging throughout history. This page will be a place to collect the information for easy retrieval by our students.

MU History Department Lecture: Mrs. Lincoln Talks to the Dead

Posted by on Feb 17, 2013 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture: Mrs. Lincoln Talks to the Dead

Starting around the 1840s in the United States, a movement known as Spiritualism swept across the country, staring in upstate New York. Practitioners believed in communication with the dead. The movement exploded in the 1860s, due in part to mounting casualties of the Civil War. Miskatonic University Associate Professor of American Studies, Dorothea Strange, files this report on Spiritualism and the Lincoln White House from Washington, DC. When Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln moved into the White House in 1861, Mrs. Lincoln already had an...

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MU History Department Lecture Series – Wonder Cabinets and Ole Worm

Posted by on Feb 3, 2013 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series – Wonder Cabinets and Ole Worm

In 16th and 17th Century Europe, during the Renaissance, many wealthy aristocrats collected artifacts from the natural world, and displayed them in elaborately designed cabinets as a way to spark wonder and reveal patterns at the core of the universe. They were first called Wunderkammern, or “wonder rooms.” These displays most often encompassed entire rooms, and were decorated with specimens of minerals, plants, animals, seashells, coral, religious relics and archaeological finds, sculptures, exotic weapons, medical deformities as well as...

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MU History Department Lecture Series – The Lost City of Zed

Posted by on Jan 6, 2013 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series – The Lost City of Zed

The Miskatonic University Department of History presents: The Lost City of Zed Between 1906 and 1924, British adventurer and gifted surveyor Percy Fawcett made seven expeditions into uncharted regions of South America. Fawcett was friends with author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who based his 1912 novel “The Lost World,” on Fawcett’s exploits. Fawcett was also a close follower of Madam Blavatsky’s Theosophical Movement. Blavatsky taught that a psychic network of enlightened spiritual masters lived in hidden cities from ancient civilizations around...

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MU History Department Lecture Series – The Dream Hunters of Corsica

Posted by on Jan 1, 2013 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series – The Dream Hunters of Corsica

Stone megaliths bearing time-tortured faces tell us that hunter-gatherers first settled on the mysterious Mediterranean island of Corsica up to nine thousand years ago. The islanders remained strangely isolated over the millennia despite being within eyeshot of France and Italy. They repelled attacks from the Carthaginians, Etruscans and Greeks. Romans arrived later but clung to the coasts. Vandals, Osrtogoths — all stopped over but left the people and the ancient culture largely untouched. Even Christianity was slow to take hold....

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MU History Department Lecture Series – Toyul, Indonesian Demon Baby

Posted by on Dec 2, 2012 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series – Toyul, Indonesian Demon Baby

The Miskatonic University Department of History presents: Toyul — The Indonesian Demon Baby Folklore around the world is saturated with stories about animated corpses and stories about demon babies But in Southeast Asia, both of these things can be found in a single powerful creature. It’s called the Toyul in Indonesian and Malaysia, this malevolent infantile spirit is said to be summoned by those who practice the black arts. The being is magically bound inside the remains of a human fetus. It can then be commanded to perform...

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MU History Department Lecture Series – Field Trip! Brazil’s Alien City

Posted by on Dec 1, 2012 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series – Field Trip! Brazil’s Alien City

The Miskatonic University Department of History presents: Field Trip: Brazil’s Alien City Brazil’s space-age capital has become a magnet for groups with cosmic and magic undertones. In 1953, the country’s former president, Juscelino Kubitschek de Oliveira, received a vision. One night he confided in his spiritual adviser, a seven-foot tall 100 year old woman named Rosa, that seven extraterrestrial beings had dictated plans for a new capital. He unrolled a detailed map shaped roughly like a giant bird or airplane, that was to become the city...

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MU History Department Lecture Series- The Saratoga Lights

Posted by on Nov 11, 2012 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series- The Saratoga Lights

The Miskatonic University Department of History presents: The Saratoga Lights Dr. Gerard: Legends about mysterious spectral lights can be found all over the United States, but the Lone Star State seems to have more than its share of such stories. Some explanations of these eerie sightings give us a window into historical events, revealing strong ties between folklore and the past.  Department of History graduate student H.G. Bukowski reports from the field in Southeast Texas on his research into the Saratoga Lights. Bukowski: Out here in the...

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MU History Department Lecture Series- Count of St. Germain

Posted by on Sep 30, 2012 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series- Count of St. Germain

Miskatonic University Department of History Lecture Series:  The Count of St. Germain Presented by: Dr. Charles Gerard In the mid-18th century, a mysterious man who called himself the Count of Saint Germain started appearing in the highest circles of European society. Some have called him a mystic genius, but others paint him as a charlatan who took advantage of superstitious royalty. He was a renaissance man, a composer, a pianist, a violinist, an accomplished painter, and a skilled alchemist. He spoke a dozen languages fluently. He was also...

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MU History Department Lecture Series- Galvanism

Posted by on Sep 16, 2012 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series- Galvanism

Miskatonic University Department of History Lecture Series:  Galvanism Presented by: Dr. Charles Gerard Many people have heard of a “galvanized” metal nail, or a group of people “galvanized” to action by some inciting event. But few know that the word is named after an 18th century Italian physician who sparked a chain of bizarre experiments with electricity. Luigi Galvani pioneered the strange science of “medical electricity.” While skinning a frog in his laboratory one day, Galvani accidentally touched a nerve in the frog’s leg with a metal...

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MU History Department Lecture Series- Stalin’s Ape-Man Army

Posted by on Sep 2, 2012 in History Department | 0 comments

MU History Department Lecture Series- Stalin’s Ape-Man Army

Miskatonic University Department of History Lecture Series:  Stalin’s Ape-Man Army Presented by: Dr. Charles Gerard Secret Russian documents uncovered in recent years reveal that in the mid-1920s, Josef Stalin ordered one of his top scientists to breed an invincible army of super-soldier ape-men. Biologists have been experimenting with cross-species hybrids since the early 19th century, spawning such unnatural creatures as ligers, tigons, and pizzly bears (oh my). But accomplished horse breeder Ilya Ivanov wanted to further test the bounds of...

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